Category Archives: fender tele 52

Fender® Telecaster®. This is it: the original guitar that started Fender’s march into contemporary music history. It appeared in the early 1950s, first named the …

1952 Fender Telecaster Guitar

Fender 52 Reissue Telecaster Left Handed

 

 

The real benefit to this is that 1952 fender telecaster guitar is now the only single coil in my house. Which means everything good about the single coil that you’d hate to sacrifice away is now retained – I feel like I’m hardwired directly into my amp! I just finished a good 3 hour session with 1952 fender telecaster putting it through its paces, hooking it into my Pro Reverb, trying it out with pedals – it’s a champ! And a road warrior too, in the pics below you’ll see the brass saddles sweated through to the tarnish. I’m looking forward to putting my own stamp on fender telecaster 1952! BTW neither the neck or body were rubbery or sticky at all, which shocked me coming from the thick rubbery butterscotch body of the other ‘fender telecaster 1952, and the sticky orange neck of an EJ strat. I can just pick fender 1952 telecaster up and get right into fender 1952 telecaster and honestly just forget about any distractions – no buzz, rattle, fretout, intonation probs, nothing! And as said before, very little hum, like WAY low. Honestly, I”ve had a few strat Area pickups that had more hum!

52 Hot Rod Tele

Luscious custom-shop touches for modern playability and tone!

The Vintage Hot Rod ’52 Telecaster takes the best of old and new Fender craftsmanship to create a fantastic guitar built for the serious player! Visually very accurate to the look of a ’52 Telecaster, it has a list of sought-after Custom Shop upgrades to make any Tele player drool. It’s got a top-of-the-line thin-skin nitrocellulose lacquer finish that ages quickly and beautifully as well as letting the natural tone of the wood shine. The neck has been streamlined for smooth playability with a satin-finish back, 9.5″ fingerboard radius, and medium-jumbo frets. The three brass saddles on the vintage-style Tele bridge are compensated to allow for more accurate intonation. And a Seymour Duncan Vintage Mini-Humbucker at the neck and a custom-wound Tele bridge pickup deliver the hot tones called for in modern music.

The rest of its features are true-blue ’52 Tele, like the American Vintage model it’s based on: a premium ash body, one-piece maple neck with U-shape profile, Fender/Gotoh vintage-style tuners, a one-ply black pickguard, and chrome hardware.

The U.S. Vintage Hot Rod Series from Fender offers new instruments with specs, looks and features that make them feel as if you were the third owner of a vintage instrument. Here’s your chance to own that beautiful player’s guitar, but in brand new shape and freshly set-up from the Fender factory!

Check the drop-down menu to the right to select colors and/or other options.

Features

  • Thin-skin nitrocellulose finish
  • Premium ash body
  • 1-piece maple neck
  • U-shape profile with satin finish on back
  • 9.5″ fingerboard radius
  • 21 medium-jumbo frets
  • 25.5″ scale length
  • Nut width: 1.650″
  • Chrome hardware
  • Fender/Gotoh vintage-style tuners
  • Vintage-style Tele bridge with 3 compensated brass saddles
  • 1-ply black pickguard
  • Custom Vintage Tele bridge pickup
  • Seymour Duncan Vintage Mini Humbucker neck pickup
  • 3-position blade pickup selector
  • Master volume and tone controls
  • Setup with Fender Super 250R Nickel Plated Steel strings (.010, .013, .017, .026, .036, .046)

52 Tele Hot Rod

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HOT ROD ’52 TELECASTER AND AMERICAN STANDARD?

Options

‎05-03-2010 04:15 PM

I watched a guy play a ’52 Hot Rod Tele at a house party a while ago…he used the neck mini-humbucker almost exclusively and his tone was just crazy good. Loved that sound.

I was looking into the ’52 Hot Rod and was wondering what are the major differences between it and an American Standard Telecaster? Obviously there’s the Duncan neck mini-humbucker, but other than that what makes the ’52 a $1500 guitar and a standard a $900 guitar?

I’d be really interested in just getting an American and putting in the neck mini-bucker myself.

52 Tele Reissue

Fender American Vintage ’52 Telecaster

 

The latest production reissue of a rock’n’roll icon…

Guitarist

 

Despite being well over half a century old now, for many players, the Telecaster will always represent the pinnacle of electric guitar design.

 

With an arguably less flashy, more workmanlike image than the curvaceous lines of the Stratocaster, and a raunchier set of basic tones, it’s also one of the few electric guitars that excels in virtually every musical setting imaginable, barring perhaps extreme metal, without fitting new pickups.

 

From the Squier Affinity range, right up to the Custom Shop Time Machine models, Fender makes a Tele for every pocket. As you might expect, the American Vintage ’52 Tele is largely a slavish reproduction of the guitar that started it all.

 

Fender tries to ensure that each guitar in its American Vintage series feels like a special package. On flipping open the catches on the attractive tweed case, apart from the fruity aroma of nitrocellulose and the plush orange of the case interior, we are greeted by a generous complement of ‘case candy’. Along with the guitar itself, you get an assortment of goodies.

 

A rather short leather strap of US origin, guitar care kit and a vintage style lead are accompanied by, in this case, a slightly ill-fitting ashtray bridge cover, a modern six-saddle replacement bridge and a capacitor and wiring diagram for converting the guitar to a more modern specification… but more on that later.

 

On removing the ’52 from its case, the nitrocellulose lacquer has that familiar aroma and slight stickiness, although initial impressions are that the butterscotch finish applied to the one-piece ash body is just a touch too dark in hue and too thick and glass-like to really capture that vintage vibe in the way that the Custom Shop Time Machine Fenders do.

 

That said, an NOS Nocaster will set you back £2099, so therein lies the difference. If you like the aged look, then the only answer that doesn’t involve sandpaper is to distress it the old-fashioned way… by gigging the hell out of it! So, rather than evoking the worn-in comfort of your favourite pair of jeans or an old leather jacket, there’s something a little stiff and new about the immediate feel of this guitar.

 

The ’52’s vintage profile frets are immaculately fitted with no sharp ends, yet the gauge of the fretwire seems a fraction fatter and a little closer to medium than some we’ve encountered. But there are plenty of impressively vintage-accurate features and the attention to detail is apparent in the choice of slot rather than crosshead screws, even down to the neck bolts and tuner screws.

 

Fender 50S Stratocaster

Play a timeless classic.

The Fender ’50s Stratocaster Electric Guitar is a reissue that captures the real feel of the Buddy Holly-era Strat. Its deep body contours, characteristic V-shaped maple neck, vintage-style hardware, classic colors, and aged plastic parts all lend authenticity to the Strat that helped birth rock ‘n’ roll.

Check the drop-down menu to the right to select colors and/or other options.

Features

  • Alder body (polyester finish)
  • Maple soft V-shaped neck (gloss urethane finish)
  • 25-1/2″ scale length
  • Maple fingerboard
  • 7.25″ radius
  • 21 vintage-style frets
  • 1.650″ nut width
  • 3 vintage-style single-coil pickups with staggered pole pieces, alnico magnets, and aged covers
  • 5-position pickup switch
  • Vintage-style synchronized tremolo
  • Master volume, neck pickup tone control, middle pickup tone control
  • Fender Ping vintage-style tuners
  • Chrome hardware
  • 1-ply white 8-hole pickguard
  • Aged knobs and switch tip
  • Synthetic bone nut

Fender 51 Nocaster

Amazing guitar! I love mine and could never part with it. Paid around $1800 for a used one. I love the huge fat baseball neck. IMO no other guitar can compare once you get used to that neck. I guess I kind of cursed myself their because other teles just don’t do it for me anymore. The fat neck is very comfortable for how big it is. Great stock Nocaster pickups, butterscotch and maple board. What else do you need?? I play this regularly through my DRRI and plan to never part with this guitar. It’s been the guitar I’ve had around the longest in my guitar playing/collecting journey.
Hope that helps, let me know if you have more questions.

Fender 52

Fine couche de vernis nitrocellulose sur corps en frêne sélectionné Radius plat 9.5”
Manche érable 1 pièce profil “U” dépoli à la laine d’acier
Frettes Medium-Jumbo
Pontets en laiton compensés
Micro manche Seymour Duncan® Mini Humbucker
Micro Chevalet Custom Vintage Tele®

Un look classique, un confort et un son résolument modernes ! La Telecaster®Vintage Hot Rod ’52 allie le meilleur de l’époque vintage et moderne en un seul et unique instrument.
Ces magnifiques caractéristiques allient un style vintage avec un micro Chevalet Tele® vintage et une très fine couche de vernis nitrocellulose, tout cela avec un style plus moderne avec un micro manche Mini HB Seymour Duncan® Vintage, un manche plus fin avec un radius plus plat ainsi qu’un vernis satiné et sans oublier des Frettes Medium Jumbo. Regardez, écoutez et ressentez à la fois ce subtil mélange de sensations vintages et modernes.

CORPS en Frêne sélectionné
MANCHE Erable 1 Pièce, profil “U”, vernis satiné à l’arrière
TOUCHE Erable, 9.5” radius (241 mm)
CHEVALET : Vintage Style Tele Bridge with three Compensated Brass Saddles
PLAQUE 1-Pli Noire
MICROS Custom Vintage Tele® (chevalet), Seymour Duncan®
Vintage Mini HB (manche)
CÂBLAGE MICROS : 3-Position Blade
Position 1. Bridge Pickup,
Position 2. Bridge and Neck Pickup,
Position 3. Neck Pickup

Fender 52 Ri Telecaster

Fender American Vintage ’52 Telecaster

 

The latest production reissue of a rock’n’roll icon…

Guitarist

 

Despite being well over half a century old now, for many players, the Telecaster will always represent the pinnacle of electric guitar design.

 

With an arguably less flashy, more workmanlike image than the curvaceous lines of the Stratocaster, and a raunchier set of basic tones, it’s also one of the few electric guitars that excels in virtually every musical setting imaginable, barring perhaps extreme metal, without fitting new pickups.

 

From the Squier Affinity range, right up to the Custom Shop Time Machine models, Fender makes a Tele for every pocket. As you might expect, the American Vintage ’52 Tele is largely a slavish reproduction of the guitar that started it all.

 

Fender tries to ensure that each guitar in its American Vintage series feels like a special package. On flipping open the catches on the attractive tweed case, apart from the fruity aroma of nitrocellulose and the plush orange of the case interior, we are greeted by a generous complement of ‘case candy’. Along with the guitar itself, you get an assortment of goodies.

 

A rather short leather strap of US origin, guitar care kit and a vintage style lead are accompanied by, in this case, a slightly ill-fitting ashtray bridge cover, a modern six-saddle replacement bridge and a capacitor and wiring diagram for converting the guitar to a more modern specification… but more on that later.

 

On removing the ’52 from its case, the nitrocellulose lacquer has that familiar aroma and slight stickiness, although initial impressions are that the butterscotch finish applied to the one-piece ash body is just a touch too dark in hue and too thick and glass-like to really capture that vintage vibe in the way that the Custom Shop Time Machine Fenders do.

 

That said, an NOS Nocaster will set you back £2099, so therein lies the difference. If you like the aged look, then the only answer that doesn’t involve sandpaper is to distress it the old-fashioned way… by gigging the hell out of it! So, rather than evoking the worn-in comfort of your favourite pair of jeans or an old leather jacket, there’s something a little stiff and new about the immediate feel of this guitar.

 

The ’52’s vintage profile frets are immaculately fitted with no sharp ends, yet the gauge of the fretwire seems a fraction fatter and a little closer to medium than some we’ve encountered. But there are plenty of impressively vintage-accurate features and the attention to detail is apparent in the choice of slot rather than crosshead screws, even down to the neck bolts and tuner screws.

 

Fender 52 Tele

True to the classic original that revolutionized the electric guitar.

Get the Fender American Vintage ’52 Telecaster Electric Guitar and you’ll be using it at most of your gigs. All original specs are adhered to in this faithful reissue, including neck shape, fingerboard radius, hardware, pickups, and electronics. Features two new American Vintage Tele pickups and the original Tele bridge, premium ash body, and a tinted maple neck.

Features

  • Premium ash body
  • Butterscotch blond nitrocellulose finish
  • Tinted maple neck
  • Original Tele bridge
  • 21 vintage-style pickups with vintage pickup switching
  • Cloth-wrapped wire
  • Wiring kit for modern switching conversion
  • Vintage-style bridge with 3 brass barrel saddles
  • Ashtray bridge cover
  • Vintage leather strap

Fender52 Tele

 

If this is the non-hotrod version, I don’t think how anyone could say that the 52 RI has a big neck. It’s smaller than my 58 Les Paul, and it’s smaller than any strat neck.

I would think for a woman..it would be perfect…especially with the vintage frets.

I must stress that this is one of the best guitars ever made.