Category Archives: fender tele 52

Fender® Telecaster®. This is it: the original guitar that started Fender’s march into contemporary music history. It appeared in the early 1950s, first named the …

Fender 52 Vintage Tele

1982 Fender ’52 Reissue Telecaster – SOLD

Home › 1982 Fender ’52 Reissue Telecaster – SOLD
Serial:

0146.

1982 Fender ’52 Vintage Reissue Telecaster.  Serial number 0146!  This is one of the very first reissue telecasters to be made.  Includes the extremely rare certificate of authenticity with matching serial number and early April 12, 1982 date!  Also includes original owners manual, original case, original warranty card, and original 6 saddle bridge.  This is the earliest 1982 reissue that we have seen here at The Fender Reissue Shop.  Neck is stamped 3-31-82.  Pots are stamped R1378143, denoting they were made the 43rd week of 1981. Note how the case does not have the rectangle metel Fender tag underneath the handle.  This was a feature only seen on the very first reissue cases to be produced (only other reissue I saw this on was V000514).  This is an incredible guitar and we are glad to have it here at The Fender Reissue Shop!

Fender Hot Rod 52 Tele

The Vintage Hot Rod ’52 Telecaster takes the best of old and new Fender craftsmanship to create a fantastic guitar built for the serious player! Visually very accurate to the look of a ’52 Telecaster, it has a list of sought-after Custom Shop upgrades to make any Tele player drool. It’s got a top-of-the-line thin-skin nitrocellulose lacquer finish that ages quickly and beautifully as well as letting the natural tone of the wood shine. The neck has been streamlined for smooth playability with a satin-finish back, 9.5″ fingerboard radius, and medium-jumbo frets. The three brass saddles on the vintage-style Tele bridge are compensated to allow for more accurate intonation. And a Seymour Duncan Vintage Mini-Humbucker at the neck and a custom-wound Tele bridge pickup deliver the hot tones called for in modern music.

The rest of its features are true-blue ’52 Tele, like the American Vintage model it’s based on: a premium ash body, one-piece maple neck with U-shape profile, Fender/Gotoh vintage-style tuners, a one-ply black pickguard, and chrome hardware.

The U.S. Vintage Hot Rod Series from Fender offers new instruments with specs, looks and features that make them feel as if you were the third owner of a vintage instrument. Here’s your chance to own that beautiful player’s guitar, but in brand new shape and freshly set-up from the Fender factory!

Check the drop-down menu to the right to select colors and/or other options.

Fender Tele 52

The American Vintage series introduces an all-new lineup of original-era model year guitars that bring Fender history and heritage to authentic and exciting new life. With key features and pivotal design elements spanning the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s, new American Vintage series instruments delve deep into Fender’s roots—expertly preserving an innovative U.S. guitar-making legacy and vividly demonstrating like never before that Fender not only knows where it’s going, but also remembers where it came from.

The American Vintage Series has long presented some of Fender’s best selling guitars (their early-’80s introduction, in fact, was one of the first signs that Fender was “back” as the CBS era ended). Today, Fender has boldly cleared the slate to make way for a fresh American Vintage series with new features, new specs and the most meticulous level of vintage accuracy yet. Rather than just replacing the previous models with different ones, we’ve completely and comprehensively re-imagined the entire vintage-reissue concept—restoring original tooling dies, voicing new pickups, reformulating vintage colors and more—based on actual vintage guitars we tracked down to make sure we had it right. We did the work, and it shows, because there’s pure tonal magic in each new American Vintage instrument.

Nowhere is this re-dedication to detail more evident than on the American Vintage ’52 Telecaster®, which returns to the fold with body, neck and pickups refined with the best features (tones, curves, perimeters, radii and more) from a handful of extraordinary ’52 Tele® specimens we examined. Premium features include an ash body with a singe-ply black pickguard and thin nitrocellulose lacquer finish in lighter Butterscotch Blonde, deep maple neck with “U”-shaped profile and generously rolled edges, sculpted headstock volute for even more first-position comfort, long-lost recessed-top “barrel” switch tip, vintage tuner spacing for truly straight string pull over the bone nut, vintage-style bridge with three brass saddles, and knurled chrome domed control knobs.

Fender Tele 52 Hot Rod

This poly coat is thicker and flatter than the Hot Rod’s sure-to-age-gracefully cellulose, and will still be this shiny when all that’s left is Keef and the cockroaches.

As for contouring there’s nothing in it: both bodies have that substantial slabby feel for which Teles are loved and loathed in equal measure.

Moving to the necks, both guitars receive two important tweaks to vintage spec in the form of a flatter-than-vintage 9.5-inch radius fingerboard and medium-jumbo frets.

The fret jobs are uniformly tidy and well executed, making the most of the flatter ‘board radius for problem-free bends anywhere on the neck.

Aesthetically, the fact that the 12th-fret dots are positioned ‘wrongly’ too close together is an annoyance to this reviewer, but much more importantly, the neck profiles are inviting; a soft ‘V’ behind the first couple of frets for the Baja Tele, and a marginally clubbier ‘U’ in the case of the Hot Rod.

As we said last month in the Vintage Hot Rod Strats review, the satin-backed nitrocellulose finish is a qualified success for the Hot Rod series as it still feels stickier than the Baja Tele’s full-on gloss polyurethane.

Also, for some reason the Hot Rod has an unusually ungainly contour where neck meets headstock on the rear – it doesn’t affect tone or playability one bit, but it looks too squared off nonetheless.

Both guitars have vintage-style Tele bridges with brass barrel saddles – again considered tonally ‘best’ for fifties Telecasters.

Potential intonation issues are addressed in the case of the Hot Rod by slanting the threads in the saddles so they sit slightly at an angle, lengthening the G string in relation to the D string for example, which is what you need to do to set the intonation correctly.

It’s hardly an exact science on the single-saddle set-up, but it is a theoretical improvement over the Baja Tele’s straight saddles.

In practice, there’s really very little in it – you could even argue that the intonation fight with this style of bridge is all part of the classic Tele tone and vibe. As it is, only the endlessly fussy will be bothered by intonation niggles on either guitar.

More noticeable is that the Baja Tele’s bridge and saddles feel marginally less substantial than the Hot Rod’s. Whether that’s down to the materials used or how well it’s coupled to the body isn’t clear, but when you tap them, the Hot Rod’s bridge sounds fuller, meatier and more solid.

There’s very little discernible difference between the slot-head machineheads on either guitar; they do their job with stoic understatement and reliability if the myriad examples that have passed through our hands over recent years are anything to go by.

The Hot Rod ’52 Tele gets a pair of uprated pickups; a ‘Custom Vintage Tele’ single-coil for the bridge, and a Seymour Duncan Vintage Mini Humbucker at the neck, which is a relatively low output, Alnico V design.

It’s the kind of pickup you’d find in Gibson Firebirds or Les Paul Deluxes and is a popular mod for Tele players who want more balls from the front pickup (Keef and Ronnie fans in particular). They’re controlled via a three-way switch that selects bridge, neck or both, as you’d expect.

Also worth a mention are the black pickguards. It might seem like an insignificant thing to some, but the Vintage Hot Rod’s guard is made of a high quality material and has lovely bevelled edges.

Sounds

If you’re in the market for a high-quality, traditional sounding Tele, the American Vintage ’52 Reissue should always be your first port of call.

It has balls where lesser models can be weedy, and underlines just how fundamental a decent piece of ash, nitro-cellulose lacquer, and top hardware and pickups are to Leo’s seminal plank.

Fender Tele 52 Reissue

I am  posting some pictures of a 1952 Fender Telecaster. I have the wonderful book called The Blackguard by Nacho Baños and after reading it, I have really become intrigued with the Telecaster. It is the longest running production electric guitar. What I think is the most fascinating is Leo Fender got it completely right at the very start. The guitar is an incredible example of genius simplicity. It’s also one of the most versatile guitars every made. You see it in the hands of rockers, jazz dudes, heavy metal, country and polka bands.

In Nacho’s book, he takes the guitars apart and photographs the minutia of them. I have done that here, inspired by Nacho. I hope you enjoy the wonderful pictures taken by my lovely wife, Julie Kerr.

Here’s a shot of the original case the guitar came with. It’s unofficially known as the “thermometer” case because of its shape. In mid 1953, Fender switched to the “poodle” case, which looks very similar to this one, but one side is flat.

Fender Tele Hot Rod 52

1952 Fender Telecaster

Pete Townshend owns or owned at least two 1952 vintage Fender Telecasters, which he used on Empty Glass and Face Dances. According to Frank Lucido, Pete acquired the primary model from Frank’s vintage guitar store California Guitar.

Frank Lucido:

It was in mint condition when I bought it from a little old lady in Oxnard. Pete used it on Empty Glass and many other recordings as well as the excellent video of “Rough Boys.” I’m not sure where Pete got some of his other Telecasters. I think he has only two total early ’50s models with the black pickguards.

The other was likely acquired by Alan Rogan, Pete’s guitar tech, from Norman’s Rare Guitars (normansrareguitars.com) in Los Angeles, Calif., in the late 1970s or early 1980.

Pete also used a 1952 Telecaster onstage for solo appearances from 1986 through 1997.

Pete Townshend in 1982 (from 1983 Schecter advertisement):

“My favourite guitar is a rare and expensive ’52 Telecaster.”

From Guitar Player, August 1996

I’m standing up there at the shows that I’m doing, and I’m carrying this ’52 Telecaster. It’s a California guitar. It’s a masterpiece. Thank God for America. Thank God for Leo, it’s a beautiful guitar. I play it like a chainsaw, and it’s still beautiful. This is a perfectly good guitar. Somebody said to me the other night, “Smash it.” I never would. You have to realize that most of the guitars I’ve smashed have not been perfectly good guitars — they’ve been junk, really.

1952 Fender Telecaster general specs:

  • Single-cutaway slab ash body with Butterscotch Blond finish.
  • One-piece, rounded “U” shape maple neck with truss rod.
  • Round button string tree.
  • Flat pole pickup in bridge position; chrome-covered pickup at neck position.
  • Two chrome knobs (volume and “blend”), three-position toggle switch.
  • Three paired brass adjustable bridge saddles.
  • Black fiber pickguard, clear-coated with lacquer.
  • Strings through body.
  • Silver “spaghetti” Fender headstock logo with black trim.

Fender Vintage 52

Shipping and handling

Item location: Merchantville, New Jersey, United States
Shipping to: United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia
Excludes: Alaska/Hawaii, US Protectorates, APO/FPO, Africa, Asia, Central America and Caribbean, Middle East, Southeast Asia, South America, American Samoa, Cook Islands, Fiji, French Polynesia, Guam, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Wallis and Futuna, Western Samoa, Bermuda, Greenland, Mexico, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Guernsey, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Jersey, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Svalbard and Jan Mayen, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, Vatican City State

Vintage Hot Rod 52 Tele

 

The Vintage Hot Rod ’52 Telecaster takes the best of old and new Fender craftsmanship to create a fantastic guitar built for the serious player! Visually very accurate to the look of a ’52 Telecaster, it has a list of sought-after Custom Shop upgrades to make any Tele player drool. It’s got a top-of-the-line thin-skin nitrocellulose lacquer finish that ages quickly and beautifully as well as letting the natural tone of the wood shine. The neck has been streamlined for smooth playability with a satin-finish back, 9.5″ fingerboard radius, and medium-jumbo frets. The three brass saddles on the vintage-style Tele bridge are compensated to allow for more accurate intonation. And a Seymour Duncan Vintage Mini-Humbucker at the neck and a custom-wound Tele bridge pickup deliver the hot tones called for in modern music.

The rest of its features are true-blue ’52 Tele, like the American Vintage model it’s based on: a premium ash body, one-piece maple neck with U-shape profile, Fender/Gotoh vintage-style tuners, a one-ply black pickguard, and chrome hardware.

The U.S. Vintage Hot Rod Series from Fender offers new instruments with specs, looks and features that make them feel as if you were the third owner of a vintage instrument. Here’s your chance to own that beautiful player’s guitar, but in brand new shape and freshly set-up from the Fender factory!